iPhone…idon’t think so

iphone-prison
Japanese retailer SoftBank are giving away the 8GB iPhone in a bid to increase take up after terrible sales. According to a report today in the Guardian the low spec of the iPhone in comparison to other Japanese handsets is the problem:

there’s no video function or multimedia messaging, the camera is poor and – with the exception of any about-to-be-launched brand, specific apps – there’s no TV tuner, which is standard on many Japanese handsets. Just one competitor is the Panasonic P905i with its 3″ TV, 3G, GPS, 5.1 megapixel camera and Wii-style motion sensors for games. 

Japan presents a problem market for the firm because of hostility to non-domestic brands.

I am not really a fan of the iPhone as it endorses and supports Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) technology, and completely blocks free software.

Apple Iphone application withdrawn

Rotten Apple
Rotten Apple

Yesterday Nullriver Software released a highly sought-after application for the Apple Iphone. The application named Netshare enables users to utilise their Iphone internet access through their Wifi-equipped PC or laptop. Yesterday the application was released for delivery on Itunes and within hours of availability was removed by Apple without explanation. It then became available a second time before being pulled again. Its surprising that Apple allowed it to be released in the first place.

Nullriver seem to be in the dark as regards to why the app was pulled, they made this statement:

Update: NetShare is now back up and available from the AppStore! We’re not quite sure why Apple took down the NetShare application yet, we’ve received no communication from Apple thus far. NetShare did not violate any of the Developer or AppStore agreements. We’re hoping we’ll get some feedback from Apple today. Sorry to all the folks that couldn’t get it in time. We’ll do our best to try to get the application back onto the AppStore if at all possible. At the very least, we hope Apple will allow it to be used in countries where the provider does permit tethering.

This is the problem for those who purchase closed-systems or proprietary software, they are in the hands of the original manufacturers who effectively tell you what you can and can’t do.